Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Sinus Infection (Sinusitis): Causes of Sinus Tooth Pain


What is a Sinus Infection (Sinusitis)?

A sinus infection can create pressure and pain in the mouth and cause a sinus tooth pain. Specifically, this is due to pressure and pain in the maxillary sinuses located behind the cheek bones. Sinus tooth pain is often confused with other causes of tooth pain, including gum disease, tooth decay, or an impacted wisdom tooth.

What Causes Sinus Infections?

A sinus infection occurs when bacteria from the nose enter the sinuses. To help you assess whether you have a sinus tooth pain or a toothache caused by something else, take note of symptoms that occur in addition to pain around the upper teeth, eyes, or cheekbones.

Sinus Infection Symptoms

Any type of sinusitis, including maxillary sinusitis, can be chronic or acute. 
Symptoms of acute maxillary sinusitis include:
  • Fever
  • Stuffy nose and nasal discharge
  • Bad breath
  • Pain that is worse when sitting up than when lying down
  • Tenderness, redness, or swelling in the cheekbones
Signs of chronic maxillary sinusitis include:
  • Cough
  • Persistent sinus toothache
  • Pain that seems worse when you have a cold or allergic reaction
Don’t ignore signs of a persistent sinus toothache or tooth pain. Sinus infection when left untreated can lead to more serious infection, so be sure to see a doctor for sinus tooth pain to treat problems before they become severe.

Sinus Infection Side Effects

One of the possible side effects from a sinus infection is that you may start breathing through your mouth. Mouth breathing promotes a dry mouth, and a dry mouth can increase your risk of dental health problems. Saliva in the mouth helps digest food and wash away the bacteria that can cause tooth decay and gingivitis.
If you notice signs of dry mouth after sinus infection tooth pain, try the following:
  • Use a fluoride toothpaste and mouth rinse daily.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Try to breathe through your nose as much as possible.

Sinus Infection Tooth Pain

Sinus tooth pain is fairly common, according to dental experts at the Mayo Clinic. Sinus infection tooth pain occurs when the fluid that builds up in the sinus cavities during a sinus infection puts pressure on your upper teeth, which are close to the maxillary sinuses.If you have sinus tooth pain, you may need to see a doctor to manage your sinus condition.
Sinus infection tooth pain might occur suddenly and usually feels like a dull ache, like something pressing down on your teeth. Or you might notice tooth sensitivity when chewing. Sinus infection tooth pain also can occur if you don’t have a full-blown sinus infection. You might notice tooth pain similar to sinus infection tooth pain if you simply have a bad head cold and sinus congestion rather than a full-blown sinus infection.Some conditions that can cause pain in the upper teeth may be confused with sinus tooth pain. Even if you think your tooth pain is related to your sinuses and should be treated by a doctor, see a dentist to rule out dental problems including:
  • Tooth Damage: A fractured or decayed tooth near the sinus cavity has similar symptoms to sinus tooth pain.
  • Tooth Grinding: Tooth grinding (bruxism) can cause pain similar to sinus tooth pain.
  • Gum Disease: The early stages of gum disease can also cause pain similar to sinus tooth pain.

Sinus Tooth Pain Relief

If your sinus tooth pain is caused by sinusitis, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics or antihistamines. If it is caused by bruxism, your dentist may recommend wearing a nighttime mouth guard. Sinus tooth pain caused by tooth damage or tooth decay will need additional dental care, such as filling a cavity.
To read the entire article visit crest.com

1317 Milstead Avenue
Conyers, GA 30012
(770) 760-0036

Sunday, October 6, 2019

Root Canals: FAQs About Treatment That Can Save Your Tooth

If you have a severely damaged, decaying tooth or a serious tooth infection (abscess), your dentist may recommend a root canal treatment. Root canals are used to repair and save your tooth instead of removing it. 

What’s Involved in Root Canal Repair?

The pulp is soft tissue inside your tooth that contains nerves, blood vessels and provides nourishment for your tooth. It can become infected if you have: 
  • A deep cavity
  • Repeated dental procedures that disturb this tissue
  • A cracked or fractured tooth
  • Injury to the tooth (even if there’s not a visible crack or chip)
If untreated, the tissues around the root of your tooth can become infected. When this happens, you will often feel pain and swelling and an abscess may form inside the tooth and/or in the bone around the end of the root of the tooth. An infection can also put you at risk of losing your tooth completely because bacteria can damage the bone that keeps your tooth connected to your jaw.

Can I Get This Treatment Done During My Regular Check-up Visit?

Your dentist will need to schedule a follow up appointment, or you may be referred to a dentist who specializes in the pulp and tissues surrounding the teeth. This specialist is known as an endodontist.

What Should I Expect?

A root canal treatment usually takes 1 or 2 office visits to complete. There is little to no pain because your dentist will use local anesthesia so you don’t feel the procedure. Once the procedure is complete, you should no longer feel the pain you felt before having it done. 
Before treatment begins, your dentist will:
  • Take X-rays to get a clear view of your tooth and the surrounding bone. 
  • Numb the area around and including your tooth so you are comfortable during the treatment. 
  • Put a thin sheet of latex rubber over your tooth to keep it dry, clean and protected from viruses, bacteria and fungus that are normally in the mouth.
During treatment, your dentist will:
  • Create an opening in the top of your tooth.
  • Remove the tooth’s nerve from inside the tooth and in the areas in the root, known the root canal. 
  • Clean inside the tooth and each root canal. Your dentist may treat the tooth with germ-killing medicine.
  • Fill the root canals with a rubber-like material to seal them against future infection.
  • Place a temporary filling on the tooth to protect it until a definitive restoration like a permanent filling or crown can be placed at the earliest opportunity.
After root canal treatment:
  • Your tooth and the area around it may feel sensitive for a few days. You can talk with your dentist about how to relieve any discomfort you may have.
  • Your dentist may prescribe antibiotics if the infection spread. Use as directed, and follow up with your dentist if you have any problems taking it.
You will need a follow-up visit after the root canal treatment. At this visit, your dentist will remove the temporary filling on the tooth and replace it with a regular filling or a crown to protect your tooth from further damage. A metal or plastic post may also be placed in the root canal to help make sure the filling materials remain in place. This helps support a crown if you need one.

How Long Will a Root Canal Filling Last?

With proper care, your restored tooth can last a lifetime. Make it a point to brush twice a day for two minutes with fluoride toothpaste, clean between your teeth once a day and see your dentist regularly to make sure your teeth are strong and healthy.
To read the entire article visit mouthhealthy.org

Advanced Dentistry of Spring   
Stephen D. Glass, DDS  
Joel C. Edgar, DDS
7000 Louetta Road, Suite A
Spring, TX 77379
(281) 376-1214 
WhiterSmiles.com

Tuesday, September 24, 2019

Warning Signs & Factors of a Gum Disease

Gum disease is an infection of the tissues that surround and support your teeth. It is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. Because gum disease is usually painless, you may not know you have it. Also referred to as periodontal disease, gum disease is caused by plaque, the sticky film of bacteria that is constantly forming on our teeth.

Here are some warning signs that can signal a problem: 

  • gums that bleed easily
  • red, swollen, tender gums
  • gums that have pulled away from the teeth
  • persistent bad breath or bad taste
  • permanent teeth that are loose or separating
  • any change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • any change in the fit of partial dentures

Some factors increase the risk of developing gum disease. They are:

  • poor oral hygiene
  • smoking or chewing tobacco
  • genetics
  • crooked teeth that are hard to keep clean 
  • pregnancy 
  • diabetes 
  • medications, including steroids, certain types of anti-epilepsy drugs, cancer therapy drugs, some calcium channel blockers and oral contraceptives
See your dentist if you suspect you have gum disease because the sooner you treat it the better. The early stage of gum disease is called gingivitis. If you have gingivitis, your gums may become red, swollen and bleed easily. At this stage, the disease is still reversible and can usually be eliminated by a professional cleaning at your dental office, followed by daily brushing and flossing. 
Advanced gum disease is called periodontitis. Chronic periodontitis affects 47.2% of adults over 30 in the United States. It can lead to the loss of tissue and bone that support the teeth and it may become more severe over time. If it does, your teeth will feel loose and start moving around in your mouth. This is the most common form of periodontitis in adults but can occur at any age. It usually gets worse slowly, but there can be periods of rapid progression.
Aggressive periodontitis is a highly destructive form of periodontal disease that occurs in patients who are otherwise healthy. Common features include rapid loss of tissue and bone and may occur in some areas of the mouth, or in the entire mouth.
Research between systemic diseases and periodontal diseases is ongoing. While a link is not conclusive, some studies indicate that severe gum disease may be associated with several other health conditions such as diabetes or stroke.
It is possible to have gum disease and have no warning signs. That is one reason why regular dental checkups and periodontal examinations are very important. Treatment methods depend upon the type of disease and how far the condition has progressed. Good dental care at home is essential to help keep periodontal disease from becoming more serious or recurring. Remember: You don’t have to lose teeth to gum disease. Brush your teeth twice a day, clean between your teeth daily, eat a balanced diet, and schedule regular dental visits for a lifetime of healthy smiles.
To read the entire article visit mouthhealthy.org



1317 Milstead Avenue
Conyers, GA 30012
(770) 760-0036

Sunday, September 15, 2019

Gum Pain Causes, Relief and Treatments



What Causes Painful Gums?

If you experience painful gums when you eat, drink, brush, or floss, you may be wondering what’s causing it and how you can treat it. Painful or bleeding gums can be caused by improper brushing or flossing techniques, gum disease, chemotherapy, tobacco use, or certain hormonal changes. It is very common for gum disease to lead to pain and bleeding, so resolving the problem is an important part of keeping your gums healthy. Your gums provide the overall support for your teeth and the basis of a healthy mouth, and if not properly cared for, early gum disease can progress to other serious oral health problems.

Below are several different causes of gum pain. Being familiar with these causes of gum pain can help you talk to your dental or medical professional when they’re diagnosing the cause of your discomfort.

  • Canker Sores: These are painful ulcers found in your mouth that can cause serious gum pain. Canker sores can be caused by stress or injury to the tissue in your mouth, or an underlying health condition such as an impaired immune system, nutritional deficiencies, or gastrointestinal disease.
  • Cuts or Abrasions: Gum pain can often be caused by a simple cut or abrasion. Braces or other dental hardware such as dentures or retainers can irritate the tissue and cause gum pain.
  • Gum Disease or Infection: Gum pain associated with sensitive or bleeding gums is often caused by gum disease or gum infection. The mildest form of gum disease, gingivitis, affects approximately one in two American adults and can cause chronic gum pain and sensitivity. If not treated properly by removing plaque from the teeth and around the gum line, gingivitis can progress to more serious gum infection.
  • Sinus Infection: A sinus infection, otherwise known as sinusitis, occurs when the tissue lining of your sinuses is swollen or inflamed, and can lead to sinus gum pain. Sinuses are normally filled with air, but when they become filled with fluid, germs can grow and lead to infection. Approximately 37 million Americans suffer from sinusitis each year, so sinus gum pain and dental pain are very common. 

If you notice any of these symptoms along with gum pain, you may want to consult with a medical professional to confirm the diagnosis and get treatment recommendations. Regardless of where your gum pain is located or its cause, chances are you’ll want to address it quickly.

Gum Pain Relief and Treatments


Gum pain can manifest in different ways. Some people experience gum pain in a single area of the gums, while others suffer from gum pain throughout their mouths. If you don’t take good care of your gums, they can deteriorate, become inflamed, infected, cut or even suffer from disease.

While there are many causes for tooth and gum pain, the treatment for most causes is pretty standard. Implementing an effective oral hygiene routine will most often help improve the health of your gums.  

A few gum pain remedies include: 

Other ways to reduce gum pain may include avoiding the use of tobacco, improving your nutrition, or reducing stress in your life. These important steps combined with an effective oral hygiene regimen can help bring your gums back to good health.
To read the entire article visit crest.com

J.M. Arrue, DMD
1317 Milstead Avenue
Conyers, GA 30012
(770) 760-0036

Friday, September 6, 2019

Dental Grills — The New Trend Affecting Dentistry And The Health Of Your Teeth

It’s the latest trend in dental wear, but there’s nothing cool about the damage it could do to your smile. Dental Grills are a cosmetic, metal and sometimes jeweled tooth covering developed in the early 1980s by hip hop artists. Grills, also called fronts, are removable and fit over the front teeth. Dental grills are made of gold, silver or jewel encrusted metals that run as little as $20 and well into the thousands for more elaborate designs.
Can Wearing a Dental Grill create Oral Health Problems? 
Yes, they can. It’s important to conduct thorough oral hygiene procedures including flossing and brushing with an anti-microbial toothpaste as food and plaque can easily develop on the grill and can cause irritation to the gingival margin and gingivitis may develop and the possibility of tooth decay. Dental grills can also cause abrasion to adjoining teeth, gum recession, tooth discoloration or chipped teeth. A grill should always be removed before eating or rinsing to clean the mouth, and may cause an allergic reaction to the metal.
School districts in Alabama, Georgia, and Texas have banned grills from their use due to disciplinary and health related reasons1. It is important to consult with a dentist regarding the steps for dental grill placement and the implications on your oral health.
Who Makes the Dental Grill? 
A dentist should make a dental grill by taking a proper impression of the teeth versus a jeweler or a grill vendor. A non-licensed dental professional could cause worse dental and oral health problems.
To read the entire article visit colgate.com

1317 Milstead Avenue
Conyers, GA 30012
(770) 760-0036

Sunday, September 1, 2019

Nutrition Tips: How to Eat Healthy

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Yolanda Eddis

Healthy eating is essential for your overall health. Choosing foods and beverages that provide the right amount of energy and nutrients goes a long way toward maintaining not only a healthy body, but also a healthy mouth. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offer numerous nutrition resources, such as sample recipes, menus and educational tools that will guide you in picking out the right foods and drinks to consume. By knowing how to eat healthy, you can improve your physical and oral health, prevent disease and promote healthy growth and development for children and adolescents.

What Is a Nutritious Diet?

Eating a nutritious diet has many benefits. A well-balanced diet should include foods from the basic food groups and subgroups along with the right oils. Nutrients such as carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins and minerals are a staple of healthy diets, but it's also important to avoid eating too many or too few nutrients.

In an effort to assist consumers to learn how to eat healthy, the U.S. Department of Agriculture developed the MyPlate website. MyPlate illustrates the five food groups, which include fruits, vegetables, grains, proteins and dairy, and provides several examples of each. Oils that come from different plants and fish are also recommended although they don't constitute a food group of their own. The selection of foods from these groups can be fresh, canned, frozen or dried. The site also recommends different ways to balance your caloric intake by increasing nutrients and decreasing the consumption of sugar and sodium in meals and snacks.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • How to Select Healthy Beverages
  • Healthy Habits after Eating and Drinking
  • Healthy Eating Tips
  • Diet and Dental Health

1317 Milstead Avenue
Conyers, GA 30012
(770) 760-0036

Halloween Candy: Your Dental Health Survival Guide

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

With Halloween comes ghosts, goblins and goodies-and the sugar in those treats can play some unwanted tricks on your teeth if you’re not careful. 

Here’s why: The bacteria in your mouth are probably more excited to eat Halloween candy than you are. When the bacteria eat the sugar and leftover food in your mouth, a weak acid is produced. That acid is what can contribute to cavities. 

But don’t hang up your costume just yet. “Halloween is about candy, dressing up and having fun,” says ADA dentist Dr. Ana Paula Ferraz-Dougherty. “It’s OK to eat that candy on Halloween as a splurge as long as you’re brushing twice a day and flossing once a day all year long.”

To help you sort through the trick-or-treat bag loot, we have a rundown of some common candies and their impact on your teeth:
Chocolate
Chocolate is probably your best bet, which is good because it’s also one of the most popular kinds of candy handed out on Halloween. ├ČChocolate is one of the better candies because it washes off your teeth easier than other types of candy,├« Dr. Ferraz- Dougherty says. “Dark chocolate also has less sugar than milk chocolate.”

Sticky and Gummy Candies
Be picky if it’s sticky. These are some of the worst candies for your teeth. “This candy is harder to remove and may stay longer on your teeth, which gives that cavity-causing bacteria more time to work,” Dr. Ferraz-Dougherty says.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Hard Candy
  • Sour Candy
  • Popcorn Balls

1317 Milstead Avenue
Conyers, GA 30012
(770) 760-0036