Monday, July 15, 2019

Baby Teeth: When Do They Come in & Fall Out? (Part 1 of 2)







Your child’s first set of teeth is as much of a milestone coming in as they are when they are wiggling loose. With the anticipation and anxiety associated with both events, it is understandable that parents want to know when to expect their baby’s first teeth to come in and when those baby teeth will fall out.

When Do Baby Teeth Come Inemerging teeth


So, how many baby teeth are there? There are 20 primary baby teeth that are already present in a child’s jaw at birth, and they usually start appearing – or erupting– between six months and one year. You can expect your child’s full set of teeth to come in by age three. You can also refer to a baby teeth chart for this. Just remember that every child is different, so no exact dates should be expected, but below is an approximate order of when you can expect baby teeth to come in:
  1. Lower center teeth (or lower center incisors) arrive between approximately six to ten months.
  2. Top center teeth (or top center incisors) arrive around eight to 12 months.
  3. Lateral incisors—just to the side of the center ones—come next between nine and 13 months.
  4. Canines between 16 and 23 months.
  5. Molars are next, with the first molars arriving between 13 to 19 months and the second molars arriving between 23 and 33 months./li>
When baby teeth begin pushing their way up through your baby’s gums, it can prove to be a very stressful time for both you and your child. Common baby teeth eruption symptoms are inflamed gums, excessive drooling, chewing on things, and irritability. It’s important to bear with your child during this time and maintain proper infant oral hygiene.
To read the entire article visit crest.com

1317 Milstead Avenue
Conyers, GA 30012
(770) 760-0036


Sunday, July 7, 2019

Is Sparkling Water Bad for My Teeth?

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

Is the satisfying fizz of your favorite sparkling water putting you at risk for tooth decay? Because any drink with carbonation-including sparkling water-has a higher acid level, some reports have questioned whether sipping sparkling water will weaken your tooth enamel (the hard outer shell of your teeth where cavities first form).

So, Is Sparkling Water Affecting My Teeth?
According to available research, sparkling water is generally fine for your teeth-and here's why. In a study using teeth that were removed as a part of treatment and donated for research, researchers tested to see whether sparkling water would attack tooth enamel more aggressively than regular lab water. The result? The two forms of water were about the same in their effects on tooth enamel. This finding suggests that, even though sparkling water is slightly more acidic than ordinary water, it's all just water to your teeth. 

Tips for Enjoying Sparkling Water-and Protecting Your Teeth

  • Sparkling water is far better for your teeth than sugary drinks. In addition, be sure to drink plenty of regular, fluoridated water, too-it’s the best beverage for your teeth. Water with fluoride naturally helps fight cavities, washes away the leftover food cavity-causing bacteria feast on and keeps your mouth from becoming dry (which can put you at a higher risk of cavities). 
  • Be mindful of what’s in your sparkling water. Citrus-flavored waters often have higher acid levels that does increase the risk of damage to your enamel. Plan to enjoy these in one sitting or with meals. This way, you aren’t sipping it throughout the day and exposing your teeth over and over again to the slightly higher level of acid it contains.
  • Sparkling water brands with added sugar can no longer be considered just sparkling water. They are a sugar-sweetened beverage, which can contribute to your risk of developing cavities. So remember-sparkling or not-plain water is always the best choice.

1317 Milstead Avenue
Conyers, GA 30012
(770) 760-0036

5 Reasons Your Smile Is Stronger Than You Think

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

The right smile can leave you laughing, fill you with joy or make you melt with emotion. But, ultimately, the best smile is one that is healthy and strong. Here are some of the “tooth truths” about how tough your teeth really are - and how to keep them that way.

1. Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the body.
The shiny, white enamel that covers your teeth is even stronger than bone. This resilient surface is 96 percent mineral, the highest percentage of any tissue in your body - making it durable and damage-resistant.    

2. Your bite is powerful!
Did you know your teeth can exert an average of 200 pounds of pressure when you bite down? That’s probably what tempts us to use our teeth as tools from time to time ñ but as your dentist will remind you, that’s one of the worst habits when it comes to preserving healthy teeth.    

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Teeth can last for hundreds of years
  • Strong as they are, teeth can't heal on their own
  • Healthy teeth have the power to resist decay, but they need our help

1317 Milstead Avenue
Conyers, GA 30012
(770) 760-0036

Tips for keeping a beautiful smile!

Keeping your teeth clean, smooth and beautiful...
Proper oral hygiene is your key to a healthy, beautiful smile. Here are our and the American Dental Association's recommendations for at home care:

  • Brush 2-3 times every day with a fluoride toothpaste (it doesn't matter which brand)
  • Floss once a day
  • Eat a healthy diet (fruits, vegetables, etc)
  • Limit consumption of sugary foods and beverages. Soda drinks can destroy teeth faster than almost anything else
  • Eliminate or at least limit use of alcohol, chewing tabacco, and cigarettes

We also recommend using an electric high-speed toothbrush in conjunction with a waterpik for your daily at-home oral care.

And don't forget six-month professional cleanings and checkups. The American Dental Association recommends checkups every six months for those ages four and older.

Professional cleanings by qualified hygienists will remove bacteria and plaque, which can cause serious dental problems if not kept in check.

If you have not been seen recently call our office for an appointment!

1317 Milstead Avenue
Conyers, GA 30012
(770) 760-0036

Having a plaque attack?

Plaque is that soft, sticky stuff that builds up on your teeth over time. It contains legions of bacteria. Left untreated it will eventually lead to gum disease, bad breath and tooth loss.

Frequent brushing and flossing are required to keep plaque at bay. But it's virtually impossible to remove all plaque without the skills of your professional dental hygienist. In other words, you're going to need some help.
Call our office today to schedule your next routine teeth cleaning to receive help with your plaque removal!

1317 Milstead Avenue
Conyers, GA 30012
(770) 760-0036

To Floss or Not to Floss..

Lately, there has been a lot of talk about flossing and if it is good or not! Kind of reminds me of coffee, some studies say is good for you and others say it isn't.

Our dental office believes that flossing is beneficial to a person's general oral health. Our staff is trained to address the issues of proper flossing to our patients on an individual need basis. We promote many different tools used to effectively and safely clean between the teeth.

If you are concerned with the recent news reports, please give our office a call to schedule an appointment. We will be happy to review your concerns and make sure you are properly caring for your teeth.

1317 Milstead Avenue
Conyers, GA 30012
(770) 760-0036

Tooth Enamel

Tooth enamel is very hard but...
That doesn't mean you can't break it.

Our office recommends to avoid eating "hard foods" such as popcorn. Don't crack nut shells with your teeth or chew on ice. Opening packages with your teeth can also damage the enamel.

It's not just the sugar - it's also the acid
Sugar and acids are your teeth's worst enemies. What are we talking about? Soft drinks, energy drinks, fruit juices, and candy.

Because of the acid content, Mountain Dew seems to be the worst of the worst. There is even a name for the damage it does and it is called "Dew Mouth."

These erode the tooth enamel, making it highly susceptible to decay. Parents, watch your kid's consumption of these because young children's enamle hasn't developed fully. This makes these drinks even more damaging for kids.

As well as eliminating the above (or at least reducing their consumption), it is recommended to always brush and floss after every meal. If you can't, use a sugar-free xylitol chewing gum after a meal. Also rinse your mouth with a high quality dental mouthwash.

1317 Milstead Avenue
Conyers, GA 30012
(770) 760-0036